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Facts & Tips You Should Know About Alzheimer's and Dementia

Springsteen on Alzheimer's: 'I've seen it in every stage'

Alzheimer's disease causes changes in the brain that lead to destruction of memory and a loss of important mental functions. Receiving a diagnosis of the disease is life-changing. So, getting educated about the disease is important. Alzheimer's is more than just forgetfulness and every case is different. Alzheimer's has frequently been labeled an "Old-Person's Disease" but although it is less common, it can happen when people are relatively young. Currently, there is no cure for the disease, but medical management with FDA approved drugs can improve quality of life.

It is very important to recognize the signs and symptoms including:

  • Memory loss
  • Confusion about time and place
  • Struggling to complete familiar actions, such as brushing teeth or getting dressed
  • Trouble finding the appropriate words, completing sentences, and following directions
  • Poor judgment when making decisions
  • Changes in mood and personality

Dealing with Alzheimer's disease

As the Alzheimer's disease progresses, a patient's ability to handle daily task dwindles. This is why it is so important to try and slow down the loss of brain cells by participating in familiar activities to stimulate the brain.

Caring for someone with Alzheimer's can require around the clock monitoring and a lot of patience. People with Alzheimer's are prone to spells of frustration, anger and paranoia as they can be quick to think that people are stealing from them.

It's a battle you shouldn't and don't have to fight alone.



Currently over 100 million people require oversight due to various forms of memory impairment. That number is expected to increase to 277 million by 2050, according to The 2013 World Alzheimer's Report.

  • 60% of them will become “lost” at least once.
  • 70% of those will become “lost” 3 or more times.
  • 46% of wanders not found within 24 hours may die.

17 Things You Should Know About Dementia

BY JOSHUA FECHTER

Many people mistake dementia as a disease and as a natural consequence of getting older when it is actually the result of damage to brain cells that affect memory. Dementia affects 47.5 million people today and there is no cure for this syndrome.

Even though Alzheimer’s accounts for 60 to 80 percent of dementia cases, many forms of dementia are a result of injury or stroke. Consequently, dementia is not always progressive and can have an immediate impact on families and friends who aren’t prepared.

For many who have dementia, they face unfair criticism because there’s no test to determine if one has this syndrome. Not surprisingly, people who have dementia can be incredibly confused about why they are having memory problems.

The good news: doctors can determine whether a person has dementia with a high degree of confidence. Still, we must stay vigilant to not criticize or condemn others when they forget things because the truth is we don’t know the cause until it’s identified.

And if you can remember these seventeen things, you’ll have a better understanding of the challenges your loved one with dementia experiences:

1. They will lose their sense of direction

People with dementia have a tendency to lose their sense of direction. It can start with forgetting particular landmarks that once helped them navigate their neighborhood. As a result, you should help them by making lists of where they like to go with detailed and visual instructions.

2. They will lose track of where they keep things

“I can’t remember where I put my keys!” From the smallest things that fit in our pocket to the bigger possessions in our lives like cars, forgetting them can’t take a tremendous mental and often physical toll on people with dementia.

3. They will repeat themselves

“I heard that story yesterday.” People with dementia forget many of the things they say, especially stories. Be careful not to interrupt them and belittle their enthusiasm to tell a story you’ve heard for the tenth time. Instead, ask different questions each time they’re deep in storytelling so the story will take on a new life.

4. They will find difficulty in doing simple tasks

From balancing a checkbook to playing poker, simple tasks will begin to seem more complicated to them. As a result, they may get frustrated with the task and even at others. Don’t let their mood affect yours and remain motivated and willing to help them.

5. They won’t always follow a storyline

Not only will people with dementia repeat stories, but they may leave out huge pieces of the stories they tell. From forgetting particular words to being unable to follow a T.V. show storyline, these are classic warning signs to look out for.

6. They can lack empathy

Having dementia can be a burden on your confidence, adventure, and emotional well-being. Consequently, people with dementia may stop going out and participating in their regular hobbies and activities. I suggest trying your best to excite them about having fun because depression makes having dementia much worse.

7. They can become angry quickly

Sudden anger outbursts, depression, and heightened hysteria are all signs of dementia. Also, it’s not always just a one-time thing, you may see a complete change in personality because when memory is affected, judgment is too.

8. They will find themselves confused

When it’s difficult to remember friends, family, and faces, people with dementia can experience overwhelming confusion. Moreover, when they try to fix the issue by explaining their point of view, they often can’t find the right words; this exacerbates the problem. Stay kind and comforting while they go through periods of disorientation.

9. They will struggle to adapt to change

Imagine being told you have dementia. Many people would react with fear and shock. Having dementia means you need to take precautionary steps to prepare for increasing symptoms. Adventurous and independent people may see these steps as irrational and as obstacles to living their normal lives.

10. They won’t always remember they love you

This is one of the hardest characteristics of dementia that affects loved ones. Having sparent, grandparents, or siblings forget who you are can be extremely tough to bear. You have to remember that it’s not them, but the symptoms of dementia. Deep down inside they will always love you.

11. They need friendship more than ever

People with dementia can feel isolated because it’s hard to prepare for worsening symptoms, and they may perceive that they’re going through this “journey” alone. Make sure they have constant reminders that you’re there for them and won’t be leaving anytime soon.

12. They are just as uncertain about the future as you are

Whether you’re a recent college graduate or in your late seventies, all of us are uncertain about what the future holds in terms of accomplishing our goals. It’s important we realize that many people with dementia have dreams they still want to achieve, too. Moreover, we should try to help them achieve these dreams before they get discouraged.

13. They are part of the nearly 7.7 million worldwide new cases of dementia each year

In other words, one new case happens every four seconds. This doesn’t mean that people with dementia are just a statistic. What this means is that dementia is a common struggle that millions of people go through. As a result, it’s important to reach out for help and advice from those who have gone through the same struggle.

14. They may not recognize the same sounds as they are used to

The music your loved one once adored now disturbs them, or they’ve suddenly taken an interest in jazz. Finding the right music for someone with dementia can be a bit of a roller coaster ride. The upside is that once you find something that attracts their taste, you’ll more than likely put a smile on their face.

15. They are not carrying a disease

People often confuse dementia as a natural disease that people receive as they age. However, dementia is not natural and not something someone else can give you — it’s just a syndrome. We should strive to educate others about dementia, so they are not scared to help.

16. They may have problems moving

People with dementia can find themselves in prolonged states of immobility. When someone’s confused and struggles to adapt to change, they become fearful; as a result, they decide keep to themselves. What they need is for their loved ones to guide them and help them embrace life no matter how small the baby steps are.

17. They need your encouragement

This sounds obvious, but encouragement is not something that’s always built strong within people, especially after years of helping a loved one with dementia. It can be a huge boulder to carry, so make sure to reach out to those currently caring for someone with dementia.

The number of people with dementia is expected to increase to 75.6 million in 2030, so we must come to terms with it. Even though we can’t prevent dementia, we can still improve our memory. Keeping an active mind, staying away from medication with adverse side effects, not excessively drinking, a good sleep schedule, and maintaining a healthy diet are just a few ways to keep your memory sharp.

Moreover, stay open-minded and if you see someone acting strange, remember that an early diagnosis can help those with dementia tremendously by helping them prepare for the future.

GPS SmartSole®

The feature that distinguishes the GPS SmartSole® from other wandering assistive devices is that it is the world’s only invisible tracking technology. In the early stages of Alzhiemer’s and dementia, the ability to hide the technology inside a shoe preserves the privacy and dignity of the wearer – an essential component of “resident centered” care for those in independent or traditional assisted living environments.

In the later stages, confusion and paranoia are the primary manifestations of the disease. Those afflicted can become agitated and attempt to remove unfamiliar or locked on items, a struggle which can cause injury to themselves or caregivers.

Finally, we know that procedural memory is the last type of memory preserved in those with Alzheimer’s and which includes habitual memory actions like getting dressed (or remaining dressed if assisted by others). Tracking technology that is NOT worn protects no one, so for all the above reasons, unobtrusively placing wearable GPS tracking technology in a shoe maximizes the odds it will be on the wanderer when needed.


Award Winning GPS Tracking Device, Wearable Technology

CTIA E-Tech Awards, Wearables, Health, Fitness & Wellness category

CTIA E-Tech Awards, Wearables, Health, Fitness & Wellness category

The patented GPS SmartSole™ features a miniaturized, invisible GPS tracking device embedded in the insoles and powered by a rechargeable battery that lasts 1-2 days on a single charge. The GPS SmartSole™ sends a signal to the central monitoring website showing the wearer's exact location using a combination of satellite and cellular technology. After you activate and setup your tracking account with GTX Corp, you will be able to monitor the person wearing the GPS SmartSole™, right from your computer, tablet or smartphone.

GTX has been formally recognized and granted various awards and mentions by prestigious organizations.

  • 2015 - Bronze Winner, Mature Market Resource Center New Product & Technology Awards; Wearable Technology Category
  • 2015 - 2nd Pl. Winner, CTIA E-Tech Awards, Wearables, Health, Fitness & Wellness
  • 2015 - Member of United Nations Global Compact
  • 2015 - AARP Top 10 New Technology
  • 2015 - Connected World Award Finalist
  • 2011 - Exhibited in 100 most important inventions of mankind – Technology Museum in Sweden
  • 2010 - Peoples Choice Award, Most Innovative Connected Device.

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